Interpreting in VR Settings: Developing an Access Plan

Three people sit at a table. On the left is a white woman with long brown hair, in the middle is a white man with grey hair and on the right is a white woman wearing glasses and a blue blouseScenario Synopsis

This series of videos is of a meeting between a VR counselor and program manager in creating an access plan for a client.

Credits for this Video

This video was originally created by the National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers as part of the Interpreting in Vocational Rehabilitation Settings series. For more information, visit: http://www.interpretereducation.org/tim/video-series/interpreting-in-vocational-rehabilitation-settings/

Transcript for Meeting without Interpretation

All comments come from program manager. Timestamps are included to allow you to navigate the text.

00:42
Yea. This is one of those frustrating things.
00:47
We’ve been through this before with community colleges
00:51
and they just don’t seem to be aware of their responsibility
00:56
to provide accommodations under the ADA.
00:59
So, I’m not sure we want to get involved in
01:04
any kind of just paying for the interpreter services
01:08
because they’re saying they don’t want to.
01:10
I’m wondering if we should develop a kind of plan
01:13
to kind of meet with them
01:14
and just review with them what their responsibilities are.
01:23
And almost educate them about what they’re required to do
01:28
when a deaf person requests interpreter services
01:31
and communication access for any kind of program they’re in.
01:36
I think we should start with that.
01:38
I mean, what are your thoughts on that – having a meeting?
01:58
Yea. Maybe start with that.
01:59
Just get some preliminary information first,
02:03
and then set up a meeting,
02:05
and just really kind of let them know
02:08
what our experience has been with other schools.
02:12
And what they’ve done to fulfill their requirements
02:15
to pay for these interpreter costs.
02:17
They may not even be aware of how to obtain interpreters,
02:22
the whole interpreter referral system, you know,
02:25
they may just not be aware of it.
02:28
But, I think, on the other hand, if we have such a meeting,
02:32
and they still say that they cannot provide these services,
02:39
for whatever reason,
02:40
most likely, they’re going to say it’s because of cost.
02:55
Yea, that’s probably where they’re going to go,
02:57
but, you know, there’s a part of me that doesn’t want
03:00
to get into a big legal hassle with them,
03:03
so I think we should be prepared to propose
03:06
that we would maybe do a cost share.
03:08
Maybe propose that we split the costs 50-50 with them,
03:13
at the very least.
03:14
So, that we don’t delay our client’s ability to start her program.
03:20
I wouldn’t want to get her all hung up in some legal wrangling with the school,
03:25
so I think we go in and we sort of let them know what their responsibilities are,
03:31
but have a backup plan and a proposal to do a cost share
03:35
and hopefully, they’ll buy into that.
03:38
What are your thoughts on that?
03:41
Interpreter: Yea. That sounds good.
03:52
Yep.
04:24
I think that’s a really good idea.
04:26
The PEPnet resources are really good
04:29
and we can probably contact them before our meeting
04:33
and see what they could provide to us.
04:36
Maybe even some documents, some handouts, resources
04:39
so we can really show them
04:40
and get them involved in some of PEPnet’s activities.
04:45
Because that’s their emphasis is post-secondary education communication access,
04:50
so I think that would be great.
05:06
Yea.
05:21
Yea. That’d be fine.
05:22
She’s local and I’m sure she’d be happy to get involved.
05:27
But like I say, let’s have a backup plan.
05:30
Let’s be prepared to, uh, I don’t think –
05:31
let’s be prepared to pay half without – so we don’t cause delay.
05:51
Yea. We probably should check with our legal department
05:55
and let them know what we’re dealing with here.
05:59
But also let them know is our primary concern
06:02
is not to delay our client’s program.
06:07
Hopefully, they’ll allow us, as they have in the past,
06:12
we’ve done this in the past when we’ve run into the situation.
06:16
Do a cost share, at least start there,
06:19
and then maybe we can, down the road,
06:22
get them to assume the full responsibility.
06:37
Good.
06:38
And hopefully, that will take the pressure off Jamie.
06:41
So, she doesn’t feel that it’s all on her.
06:44
We can kind of take the role of meeting with the school
06:48
and she doesn’t have to worry about that.
06:50
And we’ll just fill her in as to what our progress is
06:53
and what our final decision is on the cost share.
06:56
Sounds good. Sounds like a plan.
07:03
You’re welcome.

Transcript for Meeting without Interpretation

Timestamps are included to allow you to navigate the text. 

00:00
Interpreter: Hey, Neil. Thanks for taking time to meet with me.
00:04
I have a case that I wanted to bring to you.
00:07
And Jamie has a client whose name is Jane Smith
00:13
and she wants to go to City College.
00:16
She wants to major in lab tech.
00:18
And that seemed to make sense.
00:21
She got accepted into the institution
00:24
and now they’re asking us
00:25
to pick up the cost for interpreting services.
00:29
So, Jamie doesn’t really know how to respond to that request
00:35
or how to negotiate it with the college
00:37
so she came to me for help and I’m coming to you
00:39
to advise me on what steps we should take.
00:42
Neil: Yea. This is one of those frustrating things.
00:47
We’ve been through this before with many colleges
00:51
and they just don’t seem to be aware of their responsibility
00:56
to provide accommodations under the ADA.
00:59
So, I’m not sure we want to get involved in
01:04
any kind of just paying for the interpreter services
01:08
because they’re saying they don’t want to.
01:10
I’m wondering if we should develop a kind of plan
01:13
to kind of meet with them
01:14
and just review with them what their responsibilities are.
01:23
And almost educate them about what they’re required to do
01:28
when a deaf person requests interpreter services
01:31
and communication access for any kind of program they’re in.
01:36
I think we should start with that.
01:38
I mean, what are your thoughts on that – having a meeting?
01:40
Interpreter: I agree with you.
01:42
I think that would be good for a start.
01:44
I think maybe we could ask if they have
01:46
had any experience having deaf students in their college
01:50
and what came of that.
01:53
Did they take responsibility for that? Who did?
01:56
Do you think that would be a good opening question?
01:58
Neil: Yea. Maybe start with that.
01:59
Just get some preliminary information first,
02:03
and then set up a meeting,
02:05
and just really kind of let them know
02:08
what our experience has been with other schools.
02:12
And what they’ve done to fulfill their requirements
02:15
to pay for these interpreter costs.
02:17
They may not even be aware of how to obtain interpreters,
02:22
the whole interpreter referral system, you know,
02:25
they may just not be aware of it.
02:28
But, I think, on the other hand, if we have such a meeting,
02:32
and they still say that they cannot provide these services,
02:39
for whatever reason,
02:40
most likely, they’re going to say it’s because of cost.
02:44
Interpreter: So, should we ask for proof that they can’t afford this?
02:51
That the costs are too high? It’s an undue hardship, I think.
02:55
Neil: Yea, that’s probably where they’re going to go,
02:57
but, you know, there’s a part of me that doesn’t want
03:00
to get into a big legal hassle with them,
03:03
so I think we should be prepared to propose
03:06
that we would maybe do a cost share.
03:08
Maybe propose that we split the costs 50-50 with them,
03:13
at the very least.
03:14
So, that we don’t delay our client’s ability to start her program.
03:20
I wouldn’t want to get her all hung up in some legal wrangling with the school,
03:25
so I think we go in and we sort of let them know what their responsibilities are,
03:31
but have a backup plan and a proposal to do a cost share
03:35
and hopefully, they’ll buy into that.
03:38
What are your thoughts on that?
03:41
Interpreter: Yea. That sounds good.
03:44
I was thinking that maybe I would do a little investigation
03:50
about, you know, PepNet.
03:52
Neil: Yep.
03:53
Interpreter: And find out if they have information
03:57
on what other states have done.
03:58
What the practice has been elsewhere.
04:00
And working with similar colleges.
04:04
And tried to get them to provide interpreting
04:06
and who is usually responsible for the cost,
04:10
that they take it on themselves.
04:13
We could even say that other colleges do end up
04:18
paying for communication access.
04:20
So, VR is not responsible in those situations,
04:23
so, I don’t know.
04:24
Neil: I think that’s a really good idea.
04:26
The PEPnet resources are really good
04:29
and we can probably contact them before our meeting
04:33
and see what they could provide to us.
04:36
Maybe even some documents, some handouts, resources
04:39
so we can really show them
04:40
and get them involved in some of PEPnet’s activities.
04:45
Because that’s their emphasis is post-secondary education communication access,
04:50
so I think that would be great.
04:52
Interpreter: There’s a woman –
04:57
I’m forgetting her name now.
04:59
Jane something or other,
05:00
that is the New England rep for PEPnet.
05:04
Perhaps I could even ask her to meet with us.
05:06
Neil: Yea.
05:07
Interpreter: And she could help to advise the college.
05:11
Because that’s part of her project,
05:13
I think the grant does outreach throughout New England
05:17
but I think it is, as you said,
05:19
focused on communication access..
05:21
Neil: Yea. That’d be fine.
05:22
She’s local and I’m sure she’d be happy to get involved.
05:27
But like I say, let’s have a backup plan.
05:30
Let’s be prepared to, uh, I don’t think –
05:31
let’s be prepared to pay half without – so we don’t cause delay.
05:35
Interpreter: So, in terms of the backup plan,
05:43
we will need to negotiate.
05:44
You’re saying “50-50” is the starting point?
05:47
Or do we need to check with legal department
05:50
about how much that might be?
05:51
Neil: Yea. We probably should check with our legal department
05:55
and let them know what we’re dealing with here.
05:59
But also let them know is our primary concern
06:02
is not to delay our client’s program.
06:07
Hopefully, they’ll allow us, as they have in the past,
06:12
we’ve done this in the past when we’ve run into the situation.
06:16
Do a cost share, at least start there,
06:19
and then maybe we can, down the road,
06:22
get them to assume the full responsibility.
06:25
Interpreter: So, it’s June now,
06:29
so I think we’ve got enough time over the summer
06:31
to start this process – hopefully.
06:33
And we can get that all worked out
06:34
before school starts in the fall.
06:37
Neil: Good.
06:38
Interpreter: Alright.
06:38
Neil: And hopefully, that will take the pressure off Jamie.
06:41
So, she doesn’t feel that it’s all on her.
06:44
We can kind of take the role of meeting with the school
06:48
and she doesn’t have to worry about that.
06:50
And we’ll just fill her in as to what our progress is
06:53
and what our final decision is on the cost share.
06:55
Interpreter: Okay.
06:56
Neil: Sounds good. Sounds like a plan.
07:00
Interpreter. Yea, it does. Alright. Thank you.
07:03
Neil: You’re welcome.

The video uses split screen to show multiple people involved.

On the right side of the video screen, the VR counselor, Julie, has long auburn hair, white skin, is wearing glasses, and is wearing a blue blouse.  On the left is the interpreter, who is a white woman with dark brown long hair held back with a black headband, wearing a black v-neck sweater. The program manager a white man with grey, short hair and is seated to her left wearing a light blue button down table.  They are all seated around a table.

By |2018-10-20T01:17:38+00:00August 6th, 2018|Video|Comments Off on Interpreting in VR Settings: Developing an Access Plan